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unconsumption:


Toronto is one of my favorite North American cities. Even though I haven’t lived in Toronto in more than 15 years, I’ve made several return visits, for business and pleasure, and enjoy keeping tabs on what’s happening there.
Over the past several years, I’ve noticed a handful of examples of creative reuse around town, particularly in restaurants and bars on the west side. 
One such restaurant, Parts and Labour, designed by Castor, features lamps made from fire extinguishers (pictured above) and burned-out fluorescent tubes (shown below); bar stool bases are former truck springs. (photos by Lorne Bridgman, via zagat)

North of Parts and Labour, at a more recently opened place called Kitch, the bar’s constructed from wood reclaimed from a 70-year-old bowling alley. Salvaged stereo speakers are also part of the decor. (photo via Toronto Life magazine)

My brief roundup also includes Bar Neon (pictured below), where original ceilings were exposed after sections of drywall were removed during renovation. There, drinks will be served from an old shipping container (still under construction, from what I gather), and bathroom floors are inlaid with pennies. (photos by Gizelle Lau, via Toronto Life magazine)


Are there other examples that I should know about (and visit)?

unconsumption:

Toronto is one of my favorite North American cities. Even though I haven’t lived in Toronto in more than 15 years, I’ve made several return visits, for business and pleasure, and enjoy keeping tabs on what’s happening there.

Over the past several years, I’ve noticed a handful of examples of creative reuse around town, particularly in restaurants and bars on the west side. 

One such restaurant, Parts and Labour, designed by Castor, features lamps made from fire extinguishers (pictured above) and burned-out fluorescent tubes (shown below); bar stool bases are former truck springs. (photos by Lorne Bridgman, via zagat)

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North of Parts and Labour, at a more recently opened place called Kitch, the bar’s constructed from wood reclaimed from a 70-year-old bowling alley. Salvaged stereo speakers are also part of the decor. (photo via Toronto Life magazine)

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My brief roundup also includes Bar Neon (pictured below), where original ceilings were exposed after sections of drywall were removed during renovation. There, drinks will be served from an old shipping container (still under construction, from what I gather), and bathroom floors are inlaid with pennies. (photos by Gizelle Lau, via Toronto Life magazine)

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Are there other examples that I should know about (and visit)?

Tags: Toronto
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Befitting Toronto’s large size and multicultural makeup, the types of cuisine one might find in the energetic northern metropolis are as diverse as they are flavorful. As counterintuitive as it may seem, the city is home to an impressive range of soul food options—as far as it is from the American South. Here, five picks from a local to satisfy the Southern vibe north of the border.

Tags: Toronto
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Tags: Toronto
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Tyler Cowen asks for Toronto food info, gets many replies.

Tags: Toronto
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With new high-end hotels, a diverse restaurant scene and an art and architecture boom, the city that used to be a stand-in has become a standout

Tags: Toronto
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Toronto-based photographer Patrick Cummins has worked as an archivist for the City of Toronto since 1986, specializing in photographic, cartographic, and architectural records. It’s a combination of skills that has fittingly led to a new book.
Written by Shawn Micallef (co-owner of Canadian urbanism magazine Spacing), Full Frontal T.O. features Cummins’s extensive photography collection, telling the story of Toronto’s dramatic transformation through its changing buildings.
Cummins’s photographic style is straightforward, giving readers an honest view of his built subjects without exaggerating any aspect of their progressions.

(via A Timeline of Storefronts - Arts & Lifestyle - The Atlantic Cities)

Toronto-based photographer Patrick Cummins has worked as an archivist for the City of Toronto since 1986, specializing in photographic, cartographic, and architectural records. It’s a combination of skills that has fittingly led to a new book.

Written by Shawn Micallef (co-owner of Canadian urbanism magazine Spacing), Full Frontal T.O. features Cummins’s extensive photography collection, telling the story of Toronto’s dramatic transformation through its changing buildings.

Cummins’s photographic style is straightforward, giving readers an honest view of his built subjects without exaggerating any aspect of their progressions.

(via A Timeline of Storefronts - Arts & Lifestyle - The Atlantic Cities)

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Developer X is an installation piece by Reigo & Bauer that chronicles a fictional, philanthropic, vigilante developer, who  during the night anonymously drops Pre-Fab modern houses on empty lots  throughout the city.
Troubled by the disconnect between our  present day lifestyles and new housing that emulates the past, Developer  X believes that Torontonians, given the chance, will embrace  contemporary houses – houses designed to suit our current ways of living  and adopt new and innovative technologies in construction and design.

Thanks: Dave P.!

Developer X is an installation piece by Reigo & Bauer that chronicles a fictional, philanthropic, vigilante developer, who during the night anonymously drops Pre-Fab modern houses on empty lots throughout the city.

Troubled by the disconnect between our present day lifestyles and new housing that emulates the past, Developer X believes that Torontonians, given the chance, will embrace contemporary houses – houses designed to suit our current ways of living and adopt new and innovative technologies in construction and design.

Thanks: Dave P.!

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A “multicultural mall”? Meaning what? Item says it “will have over 360 retail stores including shops currently found at a local Asian shopping center. The new retail center will combine both Eastern markets and Western boutiques.” Hm.

Tags: malls toronto