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How To Park And Die In Los Angeles
Tips and ratings, more about parking than dying.

How To Park And Die In Los Angeles

Tips and ratings, more about parking than dying.

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The Best Pizza in Los Angeles: Milo & Olive
2723 Wilshire Blvd., Santa Monica; 310-453-6776
Kat Odell, editor of Eater LA and cast member of Bravo’s Eat, Drink, Love:
"Though I’m a  Pizzeria Mozza fan through and through, living on the West Side means that Nancy Silverton’s polished pies out in Hollywood aren’t always an easy reach. Another top-notch L.A. pizza haunt, which also happens to sit just down the block from me, is Milo & Olive, a Santa Monica staple from the team behind the Rustic Canyon family of restaurants. This welcoming shoe box–size bakery and café plates up a veggie-forward menu of the farmers’ market’s best, but its oversize garlic knots and exceptional wood-fired pies are the reason diners spill out to Wilshire Boulevard waiting to claim one of the restaurant’s 24 seats. While pies change based on local ingredient availability, I am especially keen on the straight-up Margherita and the mixed-mushroom, which involves a bed of melted Fontina, lemon zest, Parmesan, and thyme. Expect a thinnish yeasty crust that bubbles up around the edges, crisp to the bite, but as you eat your way outward, the crust takes on a wonderful chew.”

 (via 10 Top U.S. Pizzas at Epicurious.com)

The Best Pizza in Los Angeles: Milo & Olive

2723 Wilshire Blvd., Santa Monica; 310-453-6776

Kat Odell, editor of Eater LA and cast member of Bravo’s Eat, Drink, Love:

"Though I’m a Pizzeria Mozza fan through and through, living on the West Side means that Nancy Silverton’s polished pies out in Hollywood aren’t always an easy reach. Another top-notch L.A. pizza haunt, which also happens to sit just down the block from me, is Milo & Olive, a Santa Monica staple from the team behind the Rustic Canyon family of restaurants. This welcoming shoe box–size bakery and café plates up a veggie-forward menu of the farmers’ market’s best, but its oversize garlic knots and exceptional wood-fired pies are the reason diners spill out to Wilshire Boulevard waiting to claim one of the restaurant’s 24 seats. While pies change based on local ingredient availability, I am especially keen on the straight-up Margherita and the mixed-mushroom, which involves a bed of melted Fontina, lemon zest, Parmesan, and thyme. Expect a thinnish yeasty crust that bubbles up around the edges, crisp to the bite, but as you eat your way outward, the crust takes on a wonderful chew.”

 (via 10 Top U.S. Pizzas at Epicurious.com)

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For every existent building in your city, there are a dozen that never came to be. Some plans were abandoned for good reasons (see: LA’s 5,000-foot skyscraper), others were abandoned because of legal and financial quandaries. Either way, these forgotten drawings show us what we could’ve had.

Below, we took a look at some of the most compelling highlights from Unbuilt San Francisco, City Works: Provocations for Chicago’s Urban Future, and Never Built: Los Angeles.

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Enter The Passage of a Few People Through a Rather Brief Moment in Time, or The Passage for short. Founded by Sean Deyoe and Nathan Snider, The Passage is a weekly night bicycle journey through Los Angeles. Unlike the more flashy and famous Midnight Ridazz, The Passage is a smaller, more quiet group, and they follow in the Situationist tradition. Passable Atlas, a new exhibition at Red5 Yellow7 Gallery, highlights the wanderings of the group, with a boxy, mini-maze-like structure on which are hung photos, stories, and maps.

“Do you know where you are?” is one of the most common questions the group leaders get, said Snider in a recent lecture in the space. He has led the group through unexpected and perhaps dangerous places, uncovering new corners and secrets of the city, like the Dumpster of Fortune, a treasure chest of discarded fortune cookies, or even the Los Angeles Policy Academy, where they were promptly welcomed and given a tour.

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The next day I walked through downtown, towards Sci-ARC and the rail tracks that mark the eastern edge of what passes for the centre of LA. Sci-ARC is in a long low building that mirrors the railyards it sits in front of, and indeed the LA River, which the rail runs alongside. The size of the river’s concrete bowl indicates the flood potential of the river, even if flooding seems a little impossible given the comparative trickle of water at this point, more like an elongated puddle. Still, this part of the river has more water in it than most, and a few miles downstream the water grows in volume before becoming a vast estuary heading out to sea.

Tags: Los Angeles
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Get Involved with Los Angeles Walks to Help Make the City More Walkable- Alissa Walker wrote in Walking, Los Angeles and Urban Design

Walking is a “magic app” that builds a healthier, safer, more vibrant city. Plus, walking connects us to our communities, puts us in contact with our neighbors, builds social capital and raises civic awareness. Plus, it’s fun.
We’re organizing a campaign to get more Angelenos walking and make L.A. more walkable. If you sign up on our site at losangeleswalks.org, you can join walks and community events around L.A. throughout the year! Get involved with us and start walking!

Continue to kickstarter.com

good:

Get Involved with Los Angeles Walks to Help Make the City More Walkable
Alissa Walker wrote in Walking, Los Angeles and Urban Design

Walking is a “magic app” that builds a healthier, safer, more vibrant city. Plus, walking connects us to our communities, puts us in contact with our neighbors, builds social capital and raises civic awareness. Plus, it’s fun.

We’re organizing a campaign to get more Angelenos walking and make L.A. more walkable. If you sign up on our site at losangeleswalks.org, you can join walks and community events around L.A. throughout the year! Get involved with us and start walking!

Continue to kickstarter.com

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Here at Chez Jay in Santa Monica, where big-name Hollywood wined and dined, it might as well be 1966. But change is coming to this tiny dive bar with the king-size reputation.

Just steps from Chez Jay’s back door and that bar porthole, the city of Santa Monica is building a multi-acre park with picnic tables, hills, playgrounds and two steel observation decks with views of the ocean and the pier. Nearby, more than 300 condos and rental apartments and shops are rising at the $350-million Village at Santa Monica. In 2015, the Expo Line light rail will roll into town.

City officials envision a family-friendly, alfresco eatery to go with the new development.

Chez Jay’s owners hope their 53-year-old landmark restaurant will fill the bill. They are pondering a $1.5-million makeover to create an outdoor patio where visitors could order burgers, fries and ice cream cones (but no alcohol) at a walk-up window. The outmoded 150-square-foot kitchen would become a private dining room. A modernand much bigger kitchen would be built closer to the park. They plan to submit a proposal to the city.

Tags: los angeles
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Maybe the most interesting MLK BLVD happening of 2012 was the journey of the space shuttle through L.A. — where many people took great pictures of it, and related events, along the city’s MLK. This post offers a selection by a number of photographers.

(via L.A. journey | MLK BLVD)

Maybe the most interesting MLK BLVD happening of 2012 was the journey of the space shuttle through L.A. — where many people took great pictures of it, and related events, along the city’s MLK. This post offers a selection by a number of photographers.

(via L.A. journey | MLK BLVD)

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Downtown Los Angeles has changed dramatically in the past dozen years from being known as a high-rise office park ringed by poverty to an actual neighborhood where thousands live and more come to play.

Tags: Los Angeles
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Back when I lived in Los Angeles, I would often take guests visiting from out of town on private sightseeing tours around the city. Inevitably, during the downtown portion of the tour, they would marvel at the postapocalyptic emptiness of the streets and sidewalks. How, they would ask, could the urban core of one of the world’s biggest and most culturally significant cities be so utterly devoid of energy, of street life, of any life?

This question is at the heart of Walkable City, a new book by Jeff Speck, a city planner. Speck operates as something of an itinerant pathologist, traveling around the country helping cities fix their most intractable health problems: out-of-control congestion, unsafe streets and sidewalks, the vexing puzzles of parking policy.

Keep reading here.