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Of all the infrastructural developments in Britain between the wars, it was the appearance across the country of the National Grid’s electrical transmission towers, or pylons, that caught the imagination of poets and painters.

It did not take long for critics to start talking about Auden and his friends as the ‘Pylon Poets’, and the name stuck. More diverse in style and attitude, British visual artists could hardly be described as a school of ‘pylon painters’, but the pylon quite literally looms over some of the most interesting landscapes exhibited in Britain between the First and Second World Wars.

In time, pylons have become familiar; like windmills and canals before them, they have modified our prejudices about what landscapes ought to contain. In the early 1930s, however, pylons were potent. Carrying the industrial magic of electricity they became charged objects, conductors of meaning requiring comment. More often than not, the comment was negative. (For a time in the late 1920s the letters columns of The Times became the site of a running battle between pro-pylon and anti-pylon factions.)

But there were those who understood the fascination of these new interlopers. As early as 1937 the architect John Leslie Martin could be found arguing in Circle, the avant-garde casebook he edited with Ben Nicholson and Naum Gabo, that the ‘new aesthetic’ which would provide the subjects to match new developments of modern form and technique in the visual and plastic arts was to be sought ‘in the motor-car and the aeroplane, in the steel bridge and the line of electric pylons.

Tags: Landscapes
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Jason Gowans, 5 Landscape Modes
(via DAILY SERVING » Fan Mail: Jason Gowans)

Jason Gowans, 5 Landscape Modes

(via DAILY SERVING » Fan Mail: Jason Gowans)

Tags: Landscapes Art
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Notes on a New Nature is a physical manifestation of an ongoing research project conducted by artist, writer, and curator Nicholas O’Brien. The research critically examines and compares the relationships that contemporary artists working with digital media have to practices started in Modernist Painting - specifically the pursuit of capturing the virtual qualities of what constitutes a landscape. How does an artist depict a space faithfully enough to show its effect on a subject? Can art capture the space between the viewer and the horizon, and where does that horizon reside now that we can digitally circumnavigate the globe? Can the digital reconcile the physical?

(via doublunderscore.net - Nicholas O’Brien)

Tags: Landscapes
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A visually compelling, conceptually provocative consideration of the photographic medium, American View: Landscape Photography 1865 to Now is anything but the kind of straightforward overview such a title suggests.
Showcasing works drawn primarily from the Rhode Island School of Design’s rich photography collection, American View shifts deftly between and among periods and styles and, in so doing, illuminates the ever-evolving relationship between landscape and photographic image.

(via DAILY SERVING » Surveying the Terrain at the RISD Museum’s “American View: Landscape Photography 1865 to Now”)

A visually compelling, conceptually provocative consideration of the photographic medium, American View: Landscape Photography 1865 to Now is anything but the kind of straightforward overview such a title suggests.

Showcasing works drawn primarily from the Rhode Island School of Design’s rich photography collection, American View shifts deftly between and among periods and styles and, in so doing, illuminates the ever-evolving relationship between landscape and photographic image.

(via DAILY SERVING » Surveying the Terrain at the RISD Museum’s “American View: Landscape Photography 1865 to Now”)

Tags: Landscapes
Link

While writing my novel “The Orchardist,” I wanted to adequately render the landscape—the orchard country of central Washington state—in all its physical glory, as well as to portray how landscape can mirror characters’ inner lives. Again and again I consulted the masters to figure out how they succeeded. Great landscape writers create a world that appeals immediately to the senses, especially to sight: not only the color and shape of objects but their weight and texture, their relationship to air and light.

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Andy Adams of FlakPhoto has an interesting new digital exhibition titled Looking at the Land — 21st Century American Views that features 88 landscape photographs captured around the United States since 2000.

 (via Looking at the Land: Landscape Photogs Explain the “Why” Behind Their Shots)

Andy Adams of FlakPhoto has an interesting new digital exhibition titled Looking at the Land — 21st Century American Views that features 88 landscape photographs captured around the United States since 2000.

 (via Looking at the Land: Landscape Photogs Explain the “Why” Behind Their Shots)

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BLDGBLOG: Urban Target Complex National Monument. 

Yodaville is a fake city in the Arizona desert used for bombing runs by the U.S. Air Force. Writing for Air & Space Magazine back in 2009, Ed Darack wrote that, while tagging along on a training mission, he noticed “a small town in the distance—which, as we got closer, proved to have some pretty big buildings, some of them four stories high.”

…

In a recent article for the Tate, writer Matthew Flintham explores “the idea of landscape as an extension of the military imagination.” Referring specifically to the UK, he adds that what he perceives as a contemporary “lack of artistic engagement with the activities of the Ministry of Defence (MoD) is perhaps principally due to the relative segregation of defence personnel, land and airspace from the civil domain.”

… 

It would be thrilling to see a new kind of “fortifications tour,” one that might bring these sorts of facilities into the public experience.

BLDGBLOG: Urban Target Complex National Monument.

Yodaville is a fake city in the Arizona desert used for bombing runs by the U.S. Air Force. Writing for Air & Space Magazine back in 2009, Ed Darack wrote that, while tagging along on a training mission, he noticed “a small town in the distance—which, as we got closer, proved to have some pretty big buildings, some of them four stories high.”

In a recent article for the Tate, writer Matthew Flintham explores “the idea of landscape as an extension of the military imagination.” Referring specifically to the UK, he adds that what he perceives as a contemporary “lack of artistic engagement with the activities of the Ministry of Defence (MoD) is perhaps principally due to the relative segregation of defence personnel, land and airspace from the civil domain.”

It would be thrilling to see a new kind of “fortifications tour,” one that might bring these sorts of facilities into the public experience.

Tags: Landscapes
Photo


Eszter Burghardt creates wonderful miniature landscapes using primarily food and random objects from her studio. Her work is based on the remote and isolated geography of Iceland and the vast and epic vistas are scaled down and captured by a macro lens giving the illusion that the photographs were actually taken on site. Eszter uses poppy seeds, coco powder, coffee, milk, and chocolate cake crumbs to represent the various textures found in this landscape. The cake like volcanic landforms, milky blue lagoons, and edible faux-craters capture the likeness of this area in Iceland.


Junkculture: Edible Vistas

Eszter Burghardt creates wonderful miniature landscapes using primarily food and random objects from her studio. Her work is based on the remote and isolated geography of Iceland and the vast and epic vistas are scaled down and captured by a macro lens giving the illusion that the photographs were actually taken on site. Eszter uses poppy seeds, coco powder, coffee, milk, and chocolate cake crumbs to represent the various textures found in this landscape. The cake like volcanic landforms, milky blue lagoons, and edible faux-craters capture the likeness of this area in Iceland.

Junkculture: Edible Vistas