Photo

One winning entry in an architecture competition to reimagine the Astrodome proposes a Houston Ark.
The designers behind the entry, HiWorks with Erica Goranson, write an amusing story to go along with the images from a post-apocolyptic perspective 150 years in the future:
“In 2046, when storm waters from the relatively weak Tropical Storm Rick breached the trillion-dollar [Ike Memorial Dike] and surged up the Ship Channel, Houston knew it had only a few years left to prepare … It was not a dramatic surge of a storm that moved the Houston Ark off its moorings. Instead it was the slow and incremental rise of the Gulf.” Eventually the ark floats across what was the state of Florida.

 (via Will the Sea Swallow Houston? | OffCite Blog)

One winning entry in an architecture competition to reimagine the Astrodome proposes a Houston Ark.

The designers behind the entry, HiWorks with Erica Goranson, write an amusing story to go along with the images from a post-apocolyptic perspective 150 years in the future:

“In 2046, when storm waters from the relatively weak Tropical Storm Rick breached the trillion-dollar [Ike Memorial Dike] and surged up the Ship Channel, Houston knew it had only a few years left to prepare … It was not a dramatic surge of a storm that moved the Houston Ark off its moorings. Instead it was the slow and incremental rise of the Gulf.” Eventually the ark floats across what was the state of Florida.

 (via Will the Sea Swallow Houston? | OffCite Blog)

Photo
paddleson:

JAMES BRIDLE Continuous Monument: Manhattan, 2014archival pigment print and interactive digital fileBeginning in 1969, Superstudio, an Italian design and architecture collective, published a series of theoretical drawings called The Continuous Monument – a structure they envisioned as a single piece of architecture that would span the entire world, unifying continents and cultures. Although Superstudio conceived of this series as a physical entity, its closest expression today is found in our digital infrastructure, which is vast, global, and yet almost entirely invisible. As a tribute to their vision, James Bridle recreates The Continuous Monument inside Google Earth, allowing the viewer to explore and virtually inhabit these fantastic spaces. 

Register to BID IN PADDLES ON! in London on July 3rd →Register to PRE-BID on Paddle8 starting June 18th →

paddleson:

JAMES BRIDLE Continuous Monument: Manhattan, 2014
archival pigment print and interactive digital file

Beginning in 1969, Superstudio, an Italian design and architecture collective, published a series of theoretical drawings called The Continuous Monument – a structure they envisioned as a single piece of architecture that would span the entire world, unifying continents and cultures. Although Superstudio conceived of this series as a physical entity, its closest expression today is found in our digital infrastructure, which is vast, global, and yet almost entirely invisible. As a tribute to their vision, James Bridle recreates The Continuous Monument inside Google Earth, allowing the viewer to explore and virtually inhabit these fantastic spaces. 


Register to BID IN PADDLES ON! in London on July 3rd →
Register to PRE-BID on Paddle8 starting June 18th →

Photo
Con/struct: The Fictional Urban Architecture of Justin Plunkett | Colossal
Photo
laughingsquid:

Hive-Inn, A High-Rise Shipping Container Hotel Concept
Video

Danse Macabre - Time lapse (by Benjamin Sack)

Benjamin Sack’s incredible cityscapes are drawn with extraordinarly complex detail and filled with myriads of miniature and sometimes recognizable buildings. In his most recent solo exhibition at Ghost Print Gallery, Sack’s works loosely corresponded to the four movements of Beethoven’s “Eroica” symphony. “The overarching theme of this ‘symphony,’ Sack says, “is the hero’s journey (viz the viewer’s) into drawings detailed, complex and rich in metaphor; a sort of modern, existentialist epic.”

(Source: juxtapoz.com)

Photo

Online architecture organization Blank Space recently released renderings from its fairytale competition, wherein they asked architects to write a story and design the fantastic structures of its world.

(via Here’s What Happens When Architects Write Fairy Tales - Once Upon a Rendering - Curbed National)

Online architecture organization Blank Space recently released renderings from its fairytale competition, wherein they asked architects to write a story and design the fantastic structures of its world.

(via Here’s What Happens When Architects Write Fairy Tales - Once Upon a Rendering - Curbed National)

Photo
(via 38 Architectural Renderings You Won’t Believe Are Fake)
Photo
laughingsquid:

What It Might Look Like If New York City Hosted the Winter Olympics
Photo
(via 10 Failed Utopian Cities That Influenced the Future)
Photo
(via Bem Legaus!: Edifício reconfigurado)