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procrastinaut:


Laura Plageman [manipulates] prints and rephotographs them. … To fully appreciate the images, you have to get your head around the two realities you’re seeing, that of the landscape, and that of the photographed piece of paper. It’s, like, very metaphysical and stuff.
See more of Laura Plageman’s work on her website.

(via Deformed Landscape Photos Will Twist Your Sense of Reality)

procrastinaut:

Laura Plageman [manipulates] prints and rephotographs them. … To fully appreciate the images, you have to get your head around the two realities you’re seeing, that of the landscape, and that of the photographed piece of paper. It’s, like, very metaphysical and stuff.

See more of Laura Plageman’s work on her website.

(via Deformed Landscape Photos Will Twist Your Sense of Reality)

Photoset

staceythinx:

Architect Vincent Callebaut’s take on vertical farming is as interesting to look at as it is beneficial.

About the project:

The cities are currently responsible for 75% of the worldwide consumption of energy and they reject 80% of worldwide emissions of CO2. The contemporary urban model is thus ultra-energy consuming and works on the importation of wealth and natural resources on the one hand, and on the exportation of the pollution and waste on the other hand. This loop of energetic flows can be avoided by repatriating the countryside and the farming production modes in the heart of the city by the creation of green lungs, farmscrapers in vertical storeys and by the implantation of wind and solar power stations. The production sites of food and energy resources will be thus reintegrated in the heart of the consumption sites ! The buildings with positive energies must become the norm and reduce the carbon print on the mid term.

Read more…

(Source: mymodernmet.com, via verticaltheory)

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 The Land Art Generator Initiative, founded in 2009 by architect Robert Ferry and artist Elizabeth Monoian, is a platform for collaboration and the exchange of knowledge between aesthetics-based disciplines and technology-driven industries.
The goal of the organization is to intertwine elements of art into the science of renewable energy, ultimately creating viable solutions for the future. By taking art out of the confines of a gallery, and incorporating the utility of energy production, the organization hosts a unique niche for artists..

(via Land Art Generator Initiative Design Competition Call for submissions - SciArt in America)
I don’t really know what that means. But I think if you cut through the art-rhetoric it has something to do with inventing fake landscapes that are meant to be provocative and express ideas or arguments about the future.

The Land Art Generator Initiative, founded in 2009 by architect Robert Ferry and artist Elizabeth Monoian, is a platform for collaboration and the exchange of knowledge between aesthetics-based disciplines and technology-driven industries.

The goal of the organization is to intertwine elements of art into the science of renewable energy, ultimately creating viable solutions for the future. By taking art out of the confines of a gallery, and incorporating the utility of energy production, the organization hosts a unique niche for artists..

(via Land Art Generator Initiative Design Competition Call for submissions - SciArt in America)

I don’t really know what that means. But I think if you cut through the art-rhetoric it has something to do with inventing fake landscapes that are meant to be provocative and express ideas or arguments about the future.

Video

the postwar years were a golden age for the Jewish deli in Miami Beach, from Raphil’s to Wolfie Cohen’s Rascal House and Pumperniks.

Times change, though, and the popularity of delis has faded around the country. In South Florida, there are other changes, too. The Jewish population has shifted, geographically and culturally. Trina Sargalski talks to food historian Ted Merwin about the rise and fall of Miami delicatessens of yesteryear, and to Josh Marcus, owner and chef of Josh’s Deli, about how he’s reinventing the genre with a local twist.

Tags: Miami
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I made a trip up to the beloved dive bar, on 60th Street near Lexington since 1937, where it still sports one of the most splendid neon signs in town.
The bartender I talked to had the same noncommittal response, saying, “We’ve been ‘closing’ for nine years now, but it hasn’t happened yet.” He had a Zen-like, living-in-the-moment attitude, just taking it easy, one day at a time. “We could close as early as a few months, or it could be years from now. You never know.”
What does it mean? Nothing and everything. The short answer is: Yes, worry. But go while you can, have a few drinks, soak up the atmosphere. Tomorrow, it could be gone..

(via Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York: Subway Inn)
Another endangered landmark of my low-rent NYC past.

I made a trip up to the beloved dive bar, on 60th Street near Lexington since 1937, where it still sports one of the most splendid neon signs in town.

The bartender I talked to had the same noncommittal response, saying, “We’ve been ‘closing’ for nine years now, but it hasn’t happened yet.” He had a Zen-like, living-in-the-moment attitude, just taking it easy, one day at a time. “We could close as early as a few months, or it could be years from now. You never know.”

What does it mean? Nothing and everything. The short answer is: Yes, worry. But go while you can, have a few drinks, soak up the atmosphere. Tomorrow, it could be gone..

(via Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York: Subway Inn)

Another endangered landmark of my low-rent NYC past.

Tags: NYC
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Zak Rosen is a radio producer. Neil Greenberg is a map-maker. They’re both from Detroit, but their hearts are in a different city, a city they think is possible–at least in the imagination and maybe in reality. The radio piece they made together treats this place as if it were real. It is a creative exercise that hints at a plausible future. Fake City, Real Dreams is unlike any “arts feature” you’ve heard before.

This is amazing. Audio architecture fiction? Kinda!

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procrastinaut:


Infrastructure: a new series of collages currently on view at the Intersection for the Arts in San Francisco. In the works, Jenny Odell takes satellite-borne views of the unglamorous sites, structures, and systems that drive the modern world and digitally strips them of their surroundings, leaving them floating in white space like items from a miniature train catalog.
Each collage is based broadly around an industry–transportation, waste, power, or manufacturing–with related structures arranged in freeform clusters. Among the pieces that make them up are a German train station, a Mexican waste pond, and a sprawling nuclear plant in the heart of Arizona.

via God’s-Eye Views of Factories and Nuclear Plants, Carved From Google Maps | Wired Design | Wired.com

procrastinaut:

Infrastructure: a new series of collages currently on view at the Intersection for the Arts in San Francisco. In the works, Jenny Odell takes satellite-borne views of the unglamorous sites, structures, and systems that drive the modern world and digitally strips them of their surroundings, leaving them floating in white space like items from a miniature train catalog.

Each collage is based broadly around an industry–transportation, waste, power, or manufacturing–with related structures arranged in freeform clusters. Among the pieces that make them up are a German train station, a Mexican waste pond, and a sprawling nuclear plant in the heart of Arizona.

via God’s-Eye Views of Factories and Nuclear Plants, Carved From Google Maps | Wired Design | Wired.com

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procrastinaut:

Do you like maps? Well then: “Google just launched a Maps Gallery, a centralized atlas of maps created by governments, non-profits and other organizations.” More: The Coolest Cartography in Google’s New Maps Gallery

procrastinaut:

Do you like maps? Well then: “Google just launched a Maps Gallery, a centralized atlas of maps created by governments, non-profits and other organizations.” More: The Coolest Cartography in Google’s New Maps Gallery

Tags: Maps
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procrastinaut:


A new blog called New York Is Gross catalogues the gross landscapes of New York City that we usually do our best to ignore: dead rats and roaches, frozen rivers of trash water, splintered bones.

(via New York Is Gross - On The Media)

procrastinaut:

A new blog called New York Is Gross catalogues the gross landscapes of New York City that we usually do our best to ignore: dead rats and roaches, frozen rivers of trash water, splintered bones.

(via New York Is Gross - On The Media)

Tags: NYC
Link
Tags: NYC