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“Comic Book Cartography is a now-dormant blog devoted to maps, charts, diagrams, and other visual explainers of (mostly) fictional worlds found (mostly) in old comic books.”

(via bookofjoe: Comic Book Cartography)

Comic Book Cartography is a now-dormant blog devoted to maps, charts, diagrams, and other visual explainers of (mostly) fictional worlds found (mostly) in old comic books.”

(via bookofjoe: Comic Book Cartography)

Tags: Maps Comix
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A couple of weeks ago we showed you GooBing Detroit, a Tumblog that tracked the demise of Detroit in Street View images. And today, Gizmodo published a fascinating look at the rapid pace of gentrification that has transformed several areas of Brooklyn.

 (via Google Street View Offers a Glimpse at the Incredible Rate of Gentrification in Brooklyn)

A couple of weeks ago we showed you GooBing Detroit, a Tumblog that tracked the demise of Detroit in Street View images. And today, Gizmodo published a fascinating look at the rapid pace of gentrification that has transformed several areas of Brooklyn.

 (via Google Street View Offers a Glimpse at the Incredible Rate of Gentrification in Brooklyn)

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Evidently this is sold out, which makes me sad.
White FYHA Oil Derrick / Fuck You Houston’s Awesome!)
Via this nicely done essay in The Billfold.
Tags: Houston
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In 1733, shortly after the colony of Georgia was founded, an epidemic (thought to be Yellow Fever) started killing off the settlers. Because Savannah’s only doctor died early on, a ship carrying Sephardic Jews was allowed entry on the condition that a doctor onboard, Samuel Nunis, would treat the sick.

Soon after their arrival, the Jews organized what would later become Congregation Mickve Israel, one of America’s oldest Jewish communities. Robert Haas, Mickve Israel’s current rabbi, explained to me that at one point as much as 35 percent of Savannah’s population was Jewish. (Today the number is closer to 2.5 percent.)

Savannah has had several Jewish mayors and judges; Jews have been involved in prominent social clubs, and helped found the city’s Rotary Club and Girl Scout troop. Savannah’s Jewish Education Alliance had several competitive athletic squads.

Tags: Savannah
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To follow up on earlier link about “the go cup,” worth noting that it is not a uniquely New Orleans objects.

Savannah enters the picture via a sidebar: “Savannah: Charleston’s younger, drunker sister.”

The piece establishes Savannah as plenty nice, too, despite having “more ‘purdy’ real estate you can’t afford,” but then turns an appreciative eye to the ordinance allowing drinking outdoors in most of downtown.

“It’s a revelation: a bar crawl without the finishing up,” Hemming writes.

The author advises visitors to avoid the “waterside tourist trap” of River Street and to start an informal pub crawl at the Crystal Beer Parlor. Next up, Pinkie Master’s Lounge, and then down to West Congress Street for stops at a trio of diverse local favorites — The Rail Pub, The Jinx and Hang Fire.

Sometimes I read travel articles and am left wondering if the writer even came to Savannah, but this pithy sidebar sure feels authentic.

Some folks around town don’t want Savannah to be known for its to-go cups, but they are undoubtedly part of the city’s being.

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paddleson:

JAMES BRIDLE Continuous Monument: Manhattan, 2014archival pigment print and interactive digital fileBeginning in 1969, Superstudio, an Italian design and architecture collective, published a series of theoretical drawings called The Continuous Monument – a structure they envisioned as a single piece of architecture that would span the entire world, unifying continents and cultures. Although Superstudio conceived of this series as a physical entity, its closest expression today is found in our digital infrastructure, which is vast, global, and yet almost entirely invisible. As a tribute to their vision, James Bridle recreates The Continuous Monument inside Google Earth, allowing the viewer to explore and virtually inhabit these fantastic spaces. 

Register to BID IN PADDLES ON! in London on July 3rd →Register to PRE-BID on Paddle8 starting June 18th →

paddleson:

JAMES BRIDLE Continuous Monument: Manhattan, 2014
archival pigment print and interactive digital file

Beginning in 1969, Superstudio, an Italian design and architecture collective, published a series of theoretical drawings called The Continuous Monument – a structure they envisioned as a single piece of architecture that would span the entire world, unifying continents and cultures. Although Superstudio conceived of this series as a physical entity, its closest expression today is found in our digital infrastructure, which is vast, global, and yet almost entirely invisible. As a tribute to their vision, James Bridle recreates The Continuous Monument inside Google Earth, allowing the viewer to explore and virtually inhabit these fantastic spaces. 


Register to BID IN PADDLES ON! in London on July 3rd →
Register to PRE-BID on Paddle8 starting June 18th →

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The “moveable tent or ‘Yolo Buggy,’” as the libraries at UC Berkeley describe it, helped teams of state surveyors perform acts of measurement across the landscape in order to mathematically understand—and, thus, to tax, police, and regulate—the western terrain of the United States. It was a kind of Borgesian parade, a carnival of instruments on the move.

More: BLDGBLOG: A Building For Measuring Borders

The “moveable tent or ‘Yolo Buggy,’” as the libraries at UC Berkeley describe it, helped teams of state surveyors perform acts of measurement across the landscape in order to mathematically understand—and, thus, to tax, police, and regulate—the western terrain of the United States. It was a kind of Borgesian parade, a carnival of instruments on the move.

More: BLDGBLOG: A Building For Measuring Borders

Tags: History
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Con/struct: The Fictional Urban Architecture of Justin Plunkett | Colossal
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Kudzu Infestation in the United States — Google Sightseeing
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All Hail the Go-Cup: Culture as a Form of Control » Sociological Images
Mixed feelings here.