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Berlin gallery Decad has just opened its new permanent space, with a show called Work In Public. Excitingly, the Hypothetical Development Organization is represented in this show — along with the likes of Aram Bartholl and (whoa) Vito Acconci, among others. Very cool!  Decad’s permanent space opens in Berlin with the group exhibition 

| 11 September – 26 October | WORK IN PUBLIC Group Exhibition Tuesday – Saturday, 11 – 19 h | 25 & 26 October | WORK IN PUBLIC Two-Day Symposium 12 – 17 h | November | WORK IN PUBLIC Catalogue Release

(via Calendar - Decad)

Berlin gallery Decad has just opened its new permanent space, with a show called Work In Public. Excitingly, the Hypothetical Development Organization is represented in this show — along with the likes of Aram Bartholl and (whoa) Vito Acconci, among others. Very cool!
Decad’s permanent space opens in Berlin with the group exhibition

| 11 September – 26 October |
WORK IN PUBLIC
Group Exhibition
Tuesday – Saturday, 11 – 19 h

| 25 & 26 October |
WORK IN PUBLIC
Two-Day Symposium
12 – 17 h

| November |
WORK IN PUBLIC
Catalogue Release

(via Calendar - Decad)

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Tags: jersey
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We have recently read, with considerable amazement, a report from Curbed NOLA about what is most likely the last Hypothetical Development Organization sign that still exists “in the wild.”

Back in 2010/2011, when the project first appeared around the city, many of the signs were stolen or otherwise removed almost immediately. Others stuck around for a few months, a year.

Honestly by now we’d assumed they were all gone, to whatever destinies await such curious objects.

But, no. 

In an August 28, 2014 post, Curbed shared these pictures of the site near Urquhart St & Music St. that inspired Karmalot: “A retail karma market: The place to take the good karma others give you and sell it secondhand, or trade your spare karma for cold, hard cash. This building could be the first location of a nationwide chain with broad appeal. Kash 4 Karma, y’all” 

I couldn’t be happier to note that someone appears to have tagged the sign — “We Got It.” What does that mean? I don’t know!

Worthy of note: This particular manifestation of HDO was a collaboration with a super-backer who bought “naming rights” to one of our developments. That backer was SVA’s Masters In Branding program, founded and overseen by the delightful Debbie Millman. We worked with students from the class of 2011, who devised a thoughtful, engaging brand identity for our absurd Karmalot idea — informing the rendering ultimately executed by Mauricio Espinosa.

Also worthy of note: The primary motivation for our Kickstarter campaign was to raise money to cover the cost of hiring a printer to make professional-grade signs. And we must say, looking at how well this one has held up, OPA Signs did a great job. Worth every penny — or rather, worth every bit of time and effort it took to wring those pennies out of all you backers through Kickstarter.

Thanks again.

HDO

Via Signage Depicting Imaginary Building Uses In New Orleans by Hypothetical Development Organization » Hypo D STILL In the Wild (Incredibly!) — Kickstarter

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Invisible Cities takes its inspiration from Italo Calvino’s novel of the same name. Originally produced by Eleanor McDowall for BBC Radio 3’s Between the Ears, this documentary features contributions from writers, urban explorers and mapmakers, and invites us to eavesdrop on the hidden, fantastical and surreal stories caught between the cracks of the modern city.

Tags: Cities
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In 2008, Rhode Island’s Providence Arcade was in trouble. Considered America’s first indoor mall, the nearly 200-year-old downtown building closed after struggling to fill its cramped commercial spaces. The arcade needed an overhaul, but few viable options existed: when the possibility of a gut job arose, preservationists raised holy hell. In the end, the shopping center and its snug quarters proved just the right fit for a growing housing trend: micro apartments.

More: America’s First Shopping Mall is Now Stuffed With Micro Homes - Past Lives - Curbed National

In 2008, Rhode Island’s Providence Arcade was in trouble. Considered America’s first indoor mall, the nearly 200-year-old downtown building closed after struggling to fill its cramped commercial spaces. The arcade needed an overhaul, but few viable options existed: when the possibility of a gut job arose, preservationists raised holy hell. In the end, the shopping center and its snug quarters proved just the right fit for a growing housing trend: micro apartments.

More: America’s First Shopping Mall is Now Stuffed With Micro Homes - Past Lives - Curbed National

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Last week, a quiz from 1985 that purported to show how “upscale” your neighborhood has become provided a delightfully dated reminder (“Unisex Hair Salons” and “Travel Agencies,” anyone?) of just how long gentrification has been lamented and bougie brunch spots have been laughed at.
Figuring that our era of inexplicable “general stores,” urban B&Bs, and ubiquitous Traders Joe nonetheless deserved an updated version, Curbed LA went ahead and put one together, and though it was made with Los Angeles in mind, it could be applied almost anywhere in America.

 More: Time to Score Your Neighborhood’s Level of Gentrification - Checklists - Curbed National

Last week, a quiz from 1985 that purported to show how “upscale” your neighborhood has become provided a delightfully dated reminder (“Unisex Hair Salons” and “Travel Agencies,” anyone?) of just how long gentrification has been lamented and bougie brunch spots have been laughed at.

Figuring that our era of inexplicable “general stores,” urban B&Bs, and ubiquitous Traders Joe nonetheless deserved an updated version, Curbed LA went ahead and put one together, and though it was made with Los Angeles in mind, it could be applied almost anywhere in America.

 More: Time to Score Your Neighborhood’s Level of Gentrification - Checklists - Curbed National

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Making Better Digital Maps in an Era of Standardization - CityLab
Via Coudal.
Tags: Maps
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The Memorial of Heroic Self Sacrifice – one of London’s least-known monuments. Hidden in Postman’s Park – a tiny patch of green behind St Paul’s Cathedral.

(via No greater love - 360documentaries - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation))

The Memorial of Heroic Self Sacrifice – one of London’s least-known monuments. Hidden in Postman’s Park – a tiny patch of green behind St Paul’s Cathedral.

(via No greater love - 360documentaries - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation))

Tags: Monuments
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artchipel:

Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy (b.1986, France) - Façades

French photographer Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy presents the ongoing “Façades” series, which deconstructs images of urban landscapes down to the mere surfaces of the buildings that populate them. The digital architectural interventions illustrate cities, small towns, parking lots and pedestrian pathways, whose homes and apartment buildings bear the eerie absence of construction’s mass; only the superficial brick and concrete exterior skin remains. Wandering through foreign city streets, Gaudrillot-Roy observes and imagines what lies behind the walls he passes — a glow through a lit window, noise from a television, laughter and tears. He explains, “this series offers a vision of an unknown world that would only be a picture, without intimate space, with looks as the only refuge.” (src. Designboom)

[more Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy | artist found at darksilenceinsuburbia]

(via kenyatta)

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In The Zoo Of The Future, There Are No Cages And The Animals Roam Freely | Co.Exist | ideas impact