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In fact, a large number of towns and cities have laws and ordinances on the books preventing teenagers (and others) from loitering under certain conditions. “The facts are so local that it’s extremely difficult to generalize about loitering laws,” says Lawrence Rosenthal, who teaches constitutional law at the Fowler School of Law and who has argued loitering cases before the Supreme Court. But as a harmless-enough loiterer, there are steps you can take to make sure you’re hanging out inside the bounds of the law. Here’s a handy list:

Tags: Loitering
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(via Postcards From The Future Show What London Will Look Like After Climate Change | Co.Exist | ideas impact)
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(via Fictional Collaborations Between Artists and Architects)
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But Conn’s deepest blindness is to America’s most pervasively anti-urban policies of the last several decades: local zoning codes that impose height restrictions on new building, or tangle new construction in red tape, forcing builders to abandon plans to build up, and instead build out.

The result is suburban sprawl. In fact, apart from one line in his afterword, where Conn urges Americans to ease land-use regulations that forbid density and require developers to build parking lots, he portrays zoning—in the rare instances that he mentions it—in a wholly pro-urban light.

It’s telling that Conn picks only charmless, unsympathetic examples of anti-zoning activists: “residents in gated communities” in the Sunbelt; an anti-Semitic, anti-zoning crusader in Houston; and “property-rights advocates” who, in the 1960s and ’70s, fought stricter zoning laws across the country.

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(via The Stark Beauty Of The World’s Tallest Unoccupied Buildings)
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artandsciencejournal:

Cartographic Assemblages

Maps help us find our way in the world (or make us even more lost), but the concept of a map can also be applied when trying to organize together memories, identity, narrative and materiality.

Artist Lindsey Dunnagan explores the mapping of memories and identity in her series Mapping the Intangible, while in Mapping New Worlds, the artist focuses on manipulating topography, hinting at familiar places, but distorted in a way that the familiar becomes alien.

…. 

Similar to Dunnagan’s work, is that of Scott W. Bradford’s, but rather than mapping out specific locations which focus on geography, Bradford pieces together various elements which map out a narrative through materiality. The artist states that he links “the materiality of the surface to the drawing itself, either metaphorically or in terms of the narrative” in order to emphasize that it is constructed; his maps are fiction. In both his series’ Blueshift and Journey to Nowhere, stories are being told.

….

-Anna Paluch

(via kenyatta)

Tags: Maps
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Berlin gallery Decad has just opened its new permanent space, with a show called Work In Public. Excitingly, the Hypothetical Development Organization is represented in this show — along with the likes of Aram Bartholl and (whoa) Vito Acconci, among others. Very cool!  Decad’s permanent space opens in Berlin with the group exhibition 

| 11 September – 26 October | WORK IN PUBLIC Group Exhibition Tuesday – Saturday, 11 – 19 h | 25 & 26 October | WORK IN PUBLIC Two-Day Symposium 12 – 17 h | November | WORK IN PUBLIC Catalogue Release

(via Calendar - Decad)

Berlin gallery Decad has just opened its new permanent space, with a show called Work In Public. Excitingly, the Hypothetical Development Organization is represented in this show — along with the likes of Aram Bartholl and (whoa) Vito Acconci, among others. Very cool!
Decad’s permanent space opens in Berlin with the group exhibition

| 11 September – 26 October |
WORK IN PUBLIC
Group Exhibition
Tuesday – Saturday, 11 – 19 h

| 25 & 26 October |
WORK IN PUBLIC
Two-Day Symposium
12 – 17 h

| November |
WORK IN PUBLIC
Catalogue Release

(via Calendar - Decad)

Photoset
Tags: jersey
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We have recently read, with considerable amazement, a report from Curbed NOLA about what is most likely the last Hypothetical Development Organization sign that still exists “in the wild.”

Back in 2010/2011, when the project first appeared around the city, many of the signs were stolen or otherwise removed almost immediately. Others stuck around for a few months, a year.

Honestly by now we’d assumed they were all gone, to whatever destinies await such curious objects.

But, no. 

In an August 28, 2014 post, Curbed shared these pictures of the site near Urquhart St & Music St. that inspired Karmalot: “A retail karma market: The place to take the good karma others give you and sell it secondhand, or trade your spare karma for cold, hard cash. This building could be the first location of a nationwide chain with broad appeal. Kash 4 Karma, y’all” 

I couldn’t be happier to note that someone appears to have tagged the sign — “We Got It.” What does that mean? I don’t know!

Worthy of note: This particular manifestation of HDO was a collaboration with a super-backer who bought “naming rights” to one of our developments. That backer was SVA’s Masters In Branding program, founded and overseen by the delightful Debbie Millman. We worked with students from the class of 2011, who devised a thoughtful, engaging brand identity for our absurd Karmalot idea — informing the rendering ultimately executed by Mauricio Espinosa.

Also worthy of note: The primary motivation for our Kickstarter campaign was to raise money to cover the cost of hiring a printer to make professional-grade signs. And we must say, looking at how well this one has held up, OPA Signs did a great job. Worth every penny — or rather, worth every bit of time and effort it took to wring those pennies out of all you backers through Kickstarter.

Thanks again.

HDO

Via Signage Depicting Imaginary Building Uses In New Orleans by Hypothetical Development Organization » Hypo D STILL In the Wild (Incredibly!) — Kickstarter

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Invisible Cities takes its inspiration from Italo Calvino’s novel of the same name. Originally produced by Eleanor McDowall for BBC Radio 3’s Between the Ears, this documentary features contributions from writers, urban explorers and mapmakers, and invites us to eavesdrop on the hidden, fantastical and surreal stories caught between the cracks of the modern city.

Tags: Cities