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Turkish illustrator Emin Mete Erdogan creates painstakingly detailed mashups of modern architectural structures, and then augments them to massive proportions. In contrast to the short, two-letter signifiers (HC, GY, or AW) that serve as the titles of his sci-fi-esque architectural works, each of his paintings seems to encompass entire panoramas with their presences. Using a combination of classical and technical methods, Erdogan references similarly massive machines like the Large Hadron Collider, imbuing his illustrations witha  level of detail that draws the eye deep into the worlds he has created.

Erdogan told The Creators Project that he thinks of his creations as “aimless structures,” impossibly giant machines he conceived by “taking out [their] actual functions.” He plans out the locations for his functionless tubes, arrays, and rivets by compositing collages of modern architectural masterpieces, technical graphs, or whatever else catches his fancy. He projects those composites onto a canvas, then traces over the projections, weaving the real patterns into non-existant machines. It’s a combined process that straddles the edge between imagination and actuality.
Despite their concretized inspiration, Erdogan’s work comes off like a photo series of industrial spaceship yards, urban future highways, or interstellar weapons thankfully beyond the scope of modern science.

More: We Spoke To The Illustrator Behind These Incredible Sci-Fi Architecture Mashups | The Creators Project

Turkish illustrator Emin Mete Erdogan creates painstakingly detailed mashups of modern architectural structures, and then augments them to massive proportions. In contrast to the short, two-letter signifiers (HC, GY, or AW) that serve as the titles of his sci-fi-esque architectural works, each of his paintings seems to encompass entire panoramas with their presences. Using a combination of classical and technical methods, Erdogan references similarly massive machines like the Large Hadron Collider, imbuing his illustrations witha  level of detail that draws the eye deep into the worlds he has created.

Erdogan told The Creators Project that he thinks of his creations as “aimless structures,” impossibly giant machines he conceived by “taking out [their] actual functions.” He plans out the locations for his functionless tubes, arrays, and rivets by compositing collages of modern architectural masterpieces, technical graphs, or whatever else catches his fancy. He projects those composites onto a canvas, then traces over the projections, weaving the real patterns into non-existant machines. It’s a combined process that straddles the edge between imagination and actuality.

Despite their concretized inspiration, Erdogan’s work comes off like a photo series of industrial spaceship yards, urban future highways, or interstellar weapons thankfully beyond the scope of modern science.

More: We Spoke To The Illustrator Behind These Incredible Sci-Fi Architecture Mashups | The Creators Project

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(via Has Floating Architecture’s Moment Finally Arrived? – Next City)
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Mapsburgh sells delicate hand-cut paper street maps and fantasy maps in the style of Tolkien—and he’ll make a custom map of any place in the world.

 (via Modern cities drawn in the style of fantasy maps - Boing Boing)
Tags: Maps
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Writer Darran Anderson … [in connection with a] book he’s writing …  about how fictional cities and fantastic architectural ideas seep into the real-life cities we live in. … [B]egan sifting through piles and piles of books. He found fascinating literature, from works on obscure architectural “-isms,” and blueprints to mythical structures that featured in pulp-fiction novels.
… [T]o share the treasures he was uncovering, Anderson started tweeting the images out, name-checking often-overlooked designers, architects, and texts. …  @Oniropolis, has gained a significant following. 

(via a pretty badly written story that didn’t even bother to direct link to this guy’s Twitter account, at Building ‘Imaginary Cities’ - CityLab)

Writer Darran Anderson … [in connection with a] book he’s writing …  about how fictional cities and fantastic architectural ideas seep into the real-life cities we live in. … [B]egan sifting through piles and piles of books. He found fascinating literature, from works on obscure architectural “-isms,” and blueprints to mythical structures that featured in pulp-fiction novels.

… [T]o share the treasures he was uncovering, Anderson started tweeting the images out, name-checking often-overlooked designers, architects, and texts. …  @Oniropolis, has gained a significant following. 

(via a pretty badly written story that didn’t even bother to direct link to this guy’s Twitter account, at Building ‘Imaginary Cities’ - CityLab)

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On December 2nd, 2014— the Subway Inn will close at its current location on 60th and Lexington Ave. to begin its relocation and REPLICATION (EXACTLY AS IT IS NOW) less than 2 blocks away on the same side of the street —at 60th and Second Avenue. Our move and REPLICATION is expected to take approximately 10 weeks to complete.

(via Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York: Subway Inn on the Move)
I’m quite interested in the stated determination to “replicate” this bar “exactly as it is now,” a couple of blocks away. For some New York-based journalist, that could be an interesting thing to report/write about. Apart from how well they do in the replication effort, what exactly does even the faithful copy of the original in a new place really mean?
Can any place be truly replicated?

On December 2nd, 2014— the Subway Inn will close at its current location on 60th and Lexington Ave. to begin its relocation and REPLICATION (EXACTLY AS IT IS NOW) less than 2 blocks away on the same side of the street —at 60th and Second Avenue. Our move and REPLICATION is expected to take approximately 10 weeks to complete.

(via Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York: Subway Inn on the Move)

I’m quite interested in the stated determination to “replicate” this bar “exactly as it is now,” a couple of blocks away. For some New York-based journalist, that could be an interesting thing to report/write about. Apart from how well they do in the replication effort, what exactly does even the faithful copy of the original in a new place really mean?

Can any place be truly replicated?

Tags: NYC
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Emojify.js will convert an emoji keyword to the image. That means I can type :rocket: and the script will replace that keyword with the image . All the emojis are saved as data URIs, so I don’t need to worry about lugging around hundreds of images. All I need is emojify.js and emojify.css hooked up on my page, and a little JavaScript to get everything working.
Armed with hundreds of emojis, my next step was to swap markers with emoji keywords. After a few clicks around Mapbox.js documentation, I landed on divIcon. divIcon is the sweet spot for fully customized markers. It allows you to replace the traditional marker with a div. You can add a class to that div or, more importantly, nest HTML inside the div with the html option.
Using the html option within divIcon, I can drop the emoji keyword and  I have an emoji map marker.

(via Emoji Map Markers | Mapbox)

Emojify.js will convert an emoji keyword to the image. That means I can type :rocket: and the script will replace that keyword with the image rocket. All the emojis are saved as data URIs, so I don’t need to worry about lugging around hundreds of images. All I need is emojify.js and emojify.css hooked up on my page, and a little JavaScript to get everything working.

Armed with hundreds of emojis, my next step was to swap markers with emoji keywords. After a few clicks around Mapbox.js documentation, I landed on divIcon. divIcon is the sweet spot for fully customized markers. It allows you to replace the traditional marker with a div. You can add a class to that div or, more importantly, nest HTML inside the div with the html option.

Using the html option within divIcon, I can drop the emoji keyword and boom I have an emoji map marker.

(via Emoji Map Markers | Mapbox)

Tags: Maps Emoji
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“It’s like handwriting, everyone has their signature.” Portland-based master neon designer Mike Heist, who has been working in the neon industry for 30 years, is a master of his craft. He’s responsible for bending of some of Portland’s most iconic signage. Here’s a short documentary about the process of hand-made neon signage, and the beauty of doing work you love.

From The Pressure, Film by Ryan J. Bush.

(via Video: A day in the life of a master neon sign artist - Boing Boing)

Tags: Neon Signage
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In fact, a large number of towns and cities have laws and ordinances on the books preventing teenagers (and others) from loitering under certain conditions. “The facts are so local that it’s extremely difficult to generalize about loitering laws,” says Lawrence Rosenthal, who teaches constitutional law at the Fowler School of Law and who has argued loitering cases before the Supreme Court. But as a harmless-enough loiterer, there are steps you can take to make sure you’re hanging out inside the bounds of the law. Here’s a handy list:

Tags: Loitering
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(via Postcards From The Future Show What London Will Look Like After Climate Change | Co.Exist | ideas impact)
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(via Fictional Collaborations Between Artists and Architects)